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Prachin Buri Travel information, Prachin Buri Map

Prachin Buri used to be a very prosperous town with beautiful waterfalls and canals which are very popular among nature adventurers.

In the old days, Prachin Buri had a long history of civilization of about 800 years ago, since the Dvaravati period. The ruined town of Muang Si Mahosot at Tambon Khokpip, Amphoe Mahosot was discovered. At Ban Khok Kwang, Amphoe Si Mahosot, east to Mueang Si Mahosot, there was an ancient community at the same period as Muang Si Mahosot.

Through the traces of the ancient towns, there were discoveries of historical venues that were used for religious purposes and historic materials such as Buddha images, earthenwares, and pottery. It was also recorded that the center of civilization has been moved to the present coast of the Bang Pakong River. There were many administration alterations, from town to Monthon, and Changwat (Province) at present.

Geographical Location

In general, Prachin Buri has plain areas and highlands. There are hills and mountains in the north adjacent to Dong Phaya Yen Mountain ranges. In the south and east, there are plains and forests. Low-lying plains suitable for agriculture are in the west of the province

Climate

Prachin Buri has an alternative climate of both dry and damp. Tropical rain in the southeast monsoon season causes damp and rain throughout the season. Northwestern wind in cool season causes dryness. There are 3 different seasons: rainy, during June October ; cool, during November – February; and dry, during March – May. The average temperature of the year is approximately 27 – 30 degree Celsius or 83 – 88 degrees Fahrenheit.

Prachin Buri City Map

Prachin Buri Tourist Map

Source. Tourism Authority of Thailand

Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya Travel information, Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya Map

Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya or Ayutthaya in short, is one of Thailand’s historical and majestic highlights. Serving as the Thai capital for 417 years (1350 1767: Kingdom of Ayutthaya), it was once glorified as one of the biggest cities in Southeast Asia. During the 17th century, most foreign visitors to Ayutthaya, traders or diplomats alike, claimed Ayutthaya to be the most illustrious and glittering city that they had ever visited. The map of Ayutthaya published in 1691 by Simon de la Loubere in Du Royaume De Siam is proof of such recognition.

The Kingdom of Ayutthaya reached its apex in terms of sovereignty, military might, wealth, culture, and international commerce in the 16th century when the Kingdoms territory was extended far beyond present-day Laos, Cambodia, and Myanmar. Ayutthaya even had diplomatic relations with Louis XIV of France and was courted by Dutch, Portuguese, English, Chinese and Japanese merchants.
Visitors can explore and appreciate Thai history in Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya, which is situated only 86 kilometers north of Bangkok. Visitors to Ayutthaya can marvel at its grandeur reflected through numerous magnificent structures and ruins concentrated in and around the city island surrounded by Maenam Chao Phraya, Maenam Pa Sak and Maenam Lopburi.

More importantly,Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya Historical Park, an extensive historical site in the heart of Ayutthaya city, has been included in UNESCO’s World Heritage list since 13 December, 1991.

The Past

The Kingdom of Ayutthaya was built and developed in leaps and bounds. The ruins in Ayutthaya that survived the test of time embody both the glorious and ignominious stories of the Kingdom.

This ancient capital of the Kingdom of Ayutthaya, founded in 1350 by King U-Thong, had thirty three kings of different dynasties and reached its peak in the middle of the18th century. A magnificent city with three palaces and over 400 magnificent temples on an island threaded by canals Ayutthaya was truly an impressive city that attracted both Europeans and Asians. After a 15-month siege the Kingdom of Ayutthaya was conquered and completely destroyed by the Burmese in 1767. When King Taksin the Great finally liberated the Kingdom, a new dynasty was established and the capital was moved to Thonburi.

The seal of Ayutthaya depicts a conch on a pedestal tray placed in a small castle under a Mun tree. According to legend, King U-Thong, founder of the Kingdom of Ayutthaya, discovered a beautiful conch buried in the ground being prepared for the establishment of the seat of his Kingdom. Consequently, he had a tiny castle built to house the shell. Hence, the provincial seal.

The Present

Today, there are but groups of crumbling ruins and rows of headless Buddhas where once an empire thrived. The temple compounds are still awe-inspiring even in disrepair and a visit here is memorable and a good beginning for those drawn to the relics of history.

The architecture of Ayutthaya is a fascinating mix of Khmer (ancient Cambodian style) and early Sukhothai style. Some cactus-shaped obelisks, called prangs, denote Khmer influence and look something like the famous towers of Angkor Wat. The more pointed stupas are ascribed to the Sukhothai influence. For new arrivals who had limited their visit to Bangkok, similarities may be noted with the riverside Wat Arun, an 18th-century structure that was built in the so-called Ayutthaya style, a melding of Sukhothai Buddhist influences and Hindu-inspired Khmer motifs.

Ayutthaya is administratively divided into 16 districts: Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya, Ban Phraek, Bang Ban, Bang Pahan, Bang Pa-in, Amphoe Bang Sai, Bang Sai, Lat Bua Luang, Maha Rat, Nakhon Luang, Phachi, Phak-Hai, Sena, Tha Rua, Uthai and Wang Noi.

Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya City Map


Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya Tourist Map

Source. Tourism Authority of Thailand

Phetchaburi Travel information, Phetchaburi Map

Mrigadayavan Palace

Phetchaburi, locally known by Thais as Muang Phetch, is located 160 kilometers south of Bangkok. One of Thailands central region provinces, Phetchaburi is situated on the western shore of the Gulf of Thailand with an overall area of approximately 6,225 square kilometers. Its terrains throughout the western border, where Tanaosri Range lies as a natural border between Thailand and Myanmar, are mountainous dense jungles. In the east, there is an 80-kilometer long coastline towards the Gulf of Thailand.

Cha-Am beach

A very old city which used to be an important royal fort town, Phetchaburi had been given several names such as, Phripphri, Phripphli or Phetchaphli. Some historians have gone as far as to say that Phetchaburi could have been named in Indian style, as the Indian influence in those days day was strong. Others put forward the idea that the name Phetchaburi might have originated from Maenam Phetch the most important river of the town.

Whatever the assumptions are, the fact that Phetchaburi is an ancient city with a very long history is undeniable. This has been proven by many archaeological findings which could be dated back to the Dvaravati Period.

During Sukhothai and Ayutthaya Kingdoms, Phetchaburi was a strategic royal fort in the west. Only a lineage of Kings had the rights to rule this historical city. That is why Phetchaburi has been called by some scholars as the “Living Ayutthaya” as the town shares many similar things to the City of Ayutthaya. The prosperity of the Ayutthaya Kingdom can be seen and appreciated in Phetchaburi‘s wealth of fine old temples.

In the Rattanakosin Era, Phetchaburi has changed its character to a town of charming beauty, with peaceful seaside resorts and superb natural reserves. The three Kings of the Rattanakosin Period, King Rama IV, V, and VI established their retreats here. They built the three palaces namely Phranakhonkhiri, Phraramrajanivet, Phrarajnivesmarugadayawan in Phetchaburi thus, Phetchaburi is also known as Muang Sam Wang (the city of the three Palaces). The province is also well known for its splendid historical park, ancient temples, wonderful beaches and caves, as well as a great variety of local and fresh seafood. Phetchaburi also has a popular resort town, Cha-am which is the premier beach resort in the province.

The majority of the local residents are engaged in agricultural activities including rice farming, upland crop farming, fruit farming, palm sugar production, animal husbandry and sea and fresh water fisheries.

There are three important Maenam in Phetchaburi including “Maenam Phetchaburi with an overall length of 227 kilometers, “Maenam Bang Kloy“, with an overall length of 44 kilometers, and “Maenam Bang Tabun”, with an overall length of 18 kilometers.

Phetchaburi City Map

Phetchaburi Tourist Map

Source. Tourism Authority of Thailand

Pathum Thani Travel information, Pathum Thani Map

Pathum Thani is a neighbouring province of Bangkok. It is situated on the Chao Phraya basin with plenty of canals and orange plantations. Its original name is Mueang Sam Khok, which was founded during the Ayutthaya era. It was the settlement for the Mon people migrating from Mohtama (in Myanmar) over 350 years ago. In the year 1815 when King Rama II made a royal visit to this area, the inhabitants offered him plenty of lotus flowers which is the origin of the present name.

The Pathum Thani Town is only 46 kms. from Bangkok. It occupies an area of 1,525 square kilometres and is administratively divided into 7 districts (Amphoes): Muang Pathum Thani, Lat Lum Kaeo, Sam Khok, Thanyaburi, Nong Suea, Khlong Luang, and Lam Luk Ka.

Pathum Thani City Map

Pathum Thani Tourist Map

Source. Tourism Authority of Thailand

Nonthaburi Travel information, Nonthaburi Map

Nonthaburi is over 400 years old, dating back to when Ayutthaya was the capital. The town was originally located at Tambon Ban Talat Khwan, a famous fruit orchard where the Chao Phraya River and various canals pass through.

King Prasat Thong ordered the digging of a canal as a shortcut from the south of Wat Thai Muang to Wat Khema because the old waterway flowed into Om River to Bang Yai then to Bang Kruai Canal next to Wat Chalo before ending in front of Wat Khema.

After the new shortcut was completed, the Chao Phraya River changed its flow into the new route that remains today. In 1665, King Narai the Great noticed that the new route gave enemies too much proximity to the capital. Therefore, he ordered that a fortress be built at the mouth of Om River and relocated Nonthaburi to this area. A city shrine still stands there.

Later during the reign of King Rama IV of the Rattanakosin period, he ordered the town moved to the mouth of Bang Su Canal in Ban Talat Khwan. King Rama V then had the provincial hall built there on the left bank of the Chao Phraya River. In 1928, the hall was moved to Ratchawitthayalai, Ban Bang Khwan, Tambon Bang Tanao Si. It is now the Training Division of the Ministry of Interior on Pracha Rat 1 Road, Amphoe Muang, on the bank of the Chao Phraya River. The building is of European architecture decorated with patterned woodwork. The Fine Arts Department has registered it as an historical site. The provincial hall is now on Rattanathibet Road.

Nonthaburi City Map

Nonthaburi Tourist Map

Source. Tourism Authority of Thailand